• Ablation therapies: Procedures that destroy liver cancer cells while preserving as much of the surrounding liver tissue as possible. The 2 types of ablation therapy used for liver cancer can be radiofrequency ablation (RFA), Microwave ablation (MWA) orpercutaneous ethanol injection (PEI).
  • Angiogram: An image of blood vessels produced by an x-ray using contrast medium.
  • Beta Radiation: High-energy electrons that are sent out by radioactive nuclei 1.
  • Catheter: A tube that is inserted into canals, blood vessels, passageways or body cavities for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes (to permit injection, withdraw fluids or keep a passage open).
  • Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the gallbladder.
  • Colorectal liver metastases: Cancer that originates in the colon or rectum and has spread to the liver.
  • Conscious sedation: An induced state of sedation where the patient is able to remain responsive to verbal commands and physical stimulation as compared to being put 'completely under'.
  • Duodenitis: Inflammation of the duodenum, which is the first, shortest and widest part of the small intestine.
  • Embolisation: A treatment that blocks the flow of blood in small blood vessels, such as those feeding a tumour.
  • External beam radiotherapy: A method for delivering a beam or several beams of high-energy x-rays to a tumour. Radiation is generated outside the patient (usually by a linear accelerator) and is targeted to the tumour.
  • Femoral artery: A large artery and the main arterial supply to the leg. It begins in the lower abdomen and goes down into the thigh.
  • Gastritis: Inflammation especially of the mucous membrane of the stomach.
  • Hepatic artery: The branch of the celiac artery that supplies the liver with arterial blood.
  • Hepatic arterial chemotherapy: Chemotherapy delivered directly into the hepatic artery that mostly supplies blood to hepatic (liver) metastases and so exposes the metastases to high chemotherapy concentrations while minimising damage to healthy liver tissue.
  • Interventional radiologist: Medical doctor specialised in radiology procedures including Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT or radioembolisation).
  • Percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI): PEI is a type of ablation therapy that uses concentrated alcohol. The doctor uses a needle to inject the ethanol alcohol directly into the tumour(s). Alcohol works by drawing water out of, or dehydrating, the cancer cells, which causes them to die.
  • Portal vein: A large vein that drains all blood from the stomach and the intestines into the liver.
  • Prognosis: The forecast of the probable outcome or course of a disease.
  • Radioembolisation: A targeted treatment for liver tumours that delivers millions of tiny radioactive beads called SIR-Spheres® Y-90 resin microspheres directly to the liver tumours. (Also known as Selective Internal Radiation Therapy or SIRT).
  • Radiofrequency ablation (RFA): RFA uses a high-frequency electrical current to create heat to destroy cancer cells. The electrical current is delivered directly into the tumour by a thin needle.
  • Resection: Also called partial hepatectomy, it is surgery to remove the tumour along with some healthy liver tissue around the tumour (called the surgical margin).
  • Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT): A targeted treatment for liver tumours that delivers millions of tiny radioactive beads called SIR-Spheres Y-90 resin microspheres directly to liver tumours (Also known as radioembolisation).
  • Transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE): Treatment that blocks the blood supply in the hepatic artery while delivering chemotherapy drugs to the liver tumours.
  • Yttrium-90: Yttrium-90, or Y-90, is a radioactive element with a half-life of approximately 2.5 days that delivers beta radiation over a relatively short distance in human tissue.

 



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